Contact Us: (619) 543-7745

Caregivers and/or Families

Caregivers and/or Families

We understand that diagnosing and treating early psychosis in your child can be a distressing time for you and your family. You may find yourself feeling a range of emotions including, confusion, helplessness, frustration, loss and uncertainty, among others. Below you’ll find information about how to help your child, yourself and your family. We offer a range of services for you and your family, including Family Therapy, Family Support Groups, psychoeducation, consultations and more.

Refer to our Community and Online Resources page for more ways to connect, learn and gain support. 

NAMI San Diego

NAMI San Diego is made up of people who understand what it is like to experience a mental illness—either by having one or knowing someone else who does. At the heart of NAMI San Diego’s mission is the sharing of information and striving to end the stigma related with mental illness. NAMI SD Brochure

What is a mental health crisis?

A crisis is any situation in which a person’s behaviors puts them at risk of hurting themselves or others and/or when they are not able to resolve the situation with the skills and resources available.

The state defines an “emergency psychiatric condition” as a condition in which a person, due to a mental disorder, is an imminent danger to self or others or is immediately unable to provide for or utilize food, shelter, or clothing. (Gravely Disabled)

Read More about mental health emergencies. 

24/7 Emergency Assistance

Below are a few of the resources and crisis intervention lines operating in the County of San Diego:

PERT/General…………………………………………………………. 911

UCSD Emergency room……………………………………………. (619) 543-3400

Access & Crisis line………………………………………………….. (888) 724-7240

SD County Domestic Violence…………………………………... (888) 385-4657

Emergency Screening Unit (Adolescents)…………………... (619) 421-6900

County Emergency Psychiatric Unit…………………………... (619) 692-8200

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline………………………… ..(800) 273-8255

Learning to Help Your Child and Your Family

The information below is adapted from: National Alliance on Mental Illness: Families and Caregivers

- See more at: http://www.nami.org/Find-Support/Family-Members-and-Caregivers/Learning-to-Help-Your-Child-and-Your-Family#sthash.t4eX2JuG.dpuf

Many Americans have experienced caring for a person with mental illness. 1 in 25 Americans lives with a serious mental health condition. Mental health professionals have effective treatments for most of these conditions, yet in any given year, only 60% of people with a mental illness get mental health care.

Be Attentive

Begin by taking notice of your children’s moods, behaviors and emotions. Early intervention, especially with signs of psychosis, is critical because mental health conditions often get worse without treatment.

What to Do if You Notice Symptoms

If you think you notice symptoms, schedule an appointment with a licensed psychiatrist or psychologist as soon as you can, or if that is not possible, then with your pediatrician or primary care physician.

Learn All that You Can

In addition to seeking help from healthcare professionals, you should educate yourself as much as possible about your child’s mental health condition. NAMI Basics is an educational class that teaches parents and other family caregivers how to cope with their child’s condition and manage their recovery.” Learn more about psychosis and treatment services on NAMI’s website.

Talk with Your Child’s School

Check to be sure that your child is receiving appropriate care and services at school. Children with mental health conditions may struggle in school without assistance, leading to frustration and stress.

Work with Your Child

You need to remain respectful and understanding of your child’s feelings even if everything seems to be working against you. You should avoid getting angry at them for behaviors that are not under their control.

Taking Care of Yourself and Your Family

When you have a child with mental illness, it is easy to let your concern for them grow to consume your life. Here are some things to remember:

Take Care of Yourself

While it is your responsibility to care for and support your child, it is also your responsibility to take care of yourself. You may have to adjust your priorities or your lifestyle, but you should avoid letting the challenges posed by your child’s mental health condition make you neglect other important parts of your life.

Take Care of Your Family

Remember that if you have other children, they may resent being pushed to the side if all the attention is placed on their sibling’s mental health challenges. Make sure that they understand what their sibling is going through, and that you spend time with each of them.

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140 Arbor Drive, 4th Floor
San Diego, CA 92103
Tel: (619) 543-7745
Fax: (619) 543-7315
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